One thing I really miss from the UK is the Co-operative Bank. For the last 20 years, the Co-op has had all my money-related business because of its well documented ethical policies when it comes to investing money. Knowing my savings aren’t going to fund arms dealers or tobacco companies has been of great moral solace to me, and made me feel very smug when every one else turned on their banks after 2008.

There’s nothing quite like that in South Africa yet, but Nedbank has just sent out a press release claiming that it has become the first carbon neutral bank in Africa. As part of that, it has introduced a power management system that will reduce the energy used by 30 000 computers across its operations by up to R3.5million a year. It says that’s the equivalent of taking 1 800 cars off the road, but I’ll be following up shortly to find out where that number comes from.

More specifically, the bank reckons that the new dashboard app can help it save 12KWh per year per laptop or PC – which sounds achievable. If you assume a desktop PC draws between 100-400W including monitor and so on, it’s like turning it off for an extra 100-ish hours per year.

We’re going to chat to Nedbank and try to get more insight into exactly how and where the savings will be achieved, but colour me intrigued for now.

The power saving dash in question.
The power saving dash in question.
Adam is the Editorial Director at htxt media. He has been writing about technology for almost two full decades now. In a previous life, he was the editor of PC Format and Digital Camera Shopper in the UK, before going on to work as a freelance journalist for seven years. His work has appeared in or on Stuff, The Guardian, Linux Format, TechRadar, Wired.co.uk, PC Gamer, Green Futures, The Journalist, The Ecologist and The Review. Adam moved to South Africa in 2012 and loves 3D printers, MakerFairs and tech hubs. He hates seafood. None of his friends remember this when cooking.