Google might have been the front-runner for wearable eyeglass technology with Google Glass, but they are definitely not alone. Samsung have also entered the fray with what is purported to be Gear Glass, but a patent filing by Japanese camera manufacturer Olympus hints that they too could be getting into the game.

According to a World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) Patent Application, Olympus made the filing for “an eyeglasses-type wearable device”. From the filing, it sounds like the wearable will comprise of three parts that can detached from each other.

Where the camera is situated on the side of the head with Google Glass, the Olympus model will see the camera being affixed to front. Since it is only a patent filing, no information is available about the capturing capabilities.

The unit will also feature a sort of heads-up display on either side of the face, although some images in the patent filing suggest that two screens could be used at the same time. It would be interesting to see what Olympus has planned for the unit, and whether they would incorporate a camera’s viewfinder into one of the screens.

Here are the details of the patent filing:

An eyeglasses-type wearable device comprises: a first temple part (10) which is positioned along one temple part of a user when mounted; a second temple part (20) which is positioned along the other temple part thereof; and a front part (30) which is positioned in front of the face thereof. The front part (30) further comprises: an electrical/electronic part, including an image capture device (32); and first and second connector parts (CF1, CF2) to which the first and second temple parts (10, 20) are capable of being connected. At least one of the first and second temple parts (10, 20) further comprises an temple-side electrical/electronic part. The first and second temple parts (10, 20) are freely attachable to and detachable from the first and second connector parts (CF1, CF2) of the front part (30). Information of an image which is photographed by the image capture device (32) of the front part (30) is transmitted from the front part (30) to the temple-side electrical/electronic part.

[Image – FPO]
Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.