Before turning your Nokia Asha mobile phone into a doorstop or paperweight, there are still a couple of things you can do with it. Even though Microsoft bought Nokia in its entirety, it recently announced that it will be killing off the Asha range – but not all hope is lost.

We have compiled a list on how to make the most of your Asha device, even after all support disappears over the next 18 months or so.

Social media

facebook
Check all your social media post.

If you haven’t done so yet (where have you been?), you should really install the most popular social media applications before they are gone. Messaging service WhatsApp is making its service available for free to Asha 210 users for the phone’s lifespan. The majority of the Asha phones come pre-installed with Facebook and Twitter, but if you deleted those, better grab them from the Nokia store while you can. Mxit is in there, too.

Media player

Any Asha makes for a great music player.
Any Asha makes for a great music player.

Even after support for the Asha phones have been discontinued, it doesn’t mean that should stop using it completely. Yes, you might have upgraded to a better, slicker Lumia 1020 or 1520, but an Asha phone will make for the prefect portable music player. The Asha 200 and 210 comes supplied with 32GB of storage, which is enough to save about 52 hours of music. That is a lot of music for an afternoon run. And being used as a dedicated music player, the battery will last even longer than when used as a primary phone. So it’s a win-win for everybody.

Business communication tool

Most Asha phones have a tremendous battery life.
Most Asha phones have a tremendous battery life.

While having all the social media apps installed is a good thing, companies can also use Asha phones to their own benefit. The battery life on most Asha phones are astounding, so using the phones as a business communication tool is a very good idea. As an example, the Asha 501 has up to 48 days of stand-by time, while the 503 has 35 days of standby time. It might not be an employer’s first choice of phone, but it makes for a great alternative if off-site works needs to be done. There are also a ton of free business apps available in the Nokia store.

Doubles up as a GPS

Here maps
Easily find your way around.

Getting stuck in a part of town that you aren’t familiar with can be hugely frustrating, and if you don’t have a GPS you have to rely on the navigation app on your smartphone – which can drain the battery rather quickly. But, by installing Nokia’s HERE maps on your Asha you will never be far from a GPS service. Assuming that you have acquired a new smartphone in the meantime, you can leave the Asha in your car, and use it as a dedicated GPS unit. HERE has maps for 196 countries, supports turn-by-turn directions, and can provide you with Real-time traffic information.

Risk-free alternative phone

Take the Asha with you when you go clubbing.
Take the Asha with you when you go clubbing.

It might not be the most glamorous thing in the world, but your soon-to-be-defunct Asha will double up as the prefect phone when you go out for a night on the town. How often who you heard of someone dropping their shiny smartphone in a drink, or dropped it on the dance floor only to have it ruined forever. Well, pop the Asha in your bag and off you go. You will still be able to keep in contact with everybody while painting the town red, but if something had to happen to your Asha, it certainly would be the end of the world.

[Image – Nokia, CC by 2.0/Sasha WillinsRob NunnNikos Koutoulas]
Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.