The days of free and open source software being something that only pasty white guys living in their moms’ basements cared about are long gone. Today, the FOSS movement is absolutely huge, with even big companies buying into the concept thanks to the cost savings and beneficial functionality offered by increasingly competitive and polished FOSS options.

But of course, the movement could always be bigger, and to that end one day each year is set aside to make people more aware of what FOSS is, how it works and how it could benefit businesses. In short, why it’s rad and why you should care.

This year, Software Freedom Day – as the international day to promote FOSS is known – will be held on Saturday the 20th of September, at the Station Lounge in the Pretoria Gautrain Station. The event will run from 9am to 2pm and is free to attend, but space is limited so booking is essential.

Fortunately, the organisers are rather jacked and interested parties can indicate their interest in the event (and signal their attendance) via either Facebook or Google+.

The official schedule says there are ten speaker slots allocated to the day; voting is open for the public to choose which of the 12 speakers who have expressed interest in talking at the event will occupy those slots. Voting closes on the 5th of September.

Software developers and business people will likely get the most out of the day, which will, among other things, shed more light on how the licensing of open source software works compared to more traditional models (and the benefits thereof), and naturally to encourage its adoption across development studios and businesses around the country.

For more information head over to the official Software Freedom Day website, which can be found here.

Deon got his first taste of PC gaming at the tender age of 11 when his father bought an 8088 XT, ostensibly to "help him with his homework". Instead, it introduced him to Leisure Suit Larry, King Graham, Sonny Bonds and many more, and Deon has been a PC gamer and hardware enthusiast ever since. He landed his first professional writing gig in 2006 at a prestigious local PC magazine, a very happy happenstance as he got to write for a living about things he loves - tech, PCs, gaming, and everything in between. He's been writing about it all ever since, and loves every minute of it.