Instagram launched its Hyperlapse functionality a while back, turning mundane images into super-fast action scenes with the back camera of your iPhone. Well, it seems that people wanted to do the same thing while taking selfies – and Instagram listened.

As part of the apps update that will be rolling out to iPhones from today, you will now be able to take high-speed selfies by using the phone’s front-facing camera.

According to The Verge, Instagram has given a number of tips on how to make the most of the new feature by giving some examples:

  • Stand still and have a moving background (ie. Times Square foot traffic, riding a roller coaster).
  • Capture yourself walking down the street as your surroundings whirl by.
  • Document transformations — getting a new haircut, applying makeup or tying a tie — by propping your phone up against a wall.
  • Hold up your phone as you spin around in a chair, or jump on a trampoline.

Just as with the back-facing Hyperlapse videos, you will still be able to share your new super-fast creations with all your friends to ogle at on Facebook, Twitter or just save it to your Camera Roll.

Unfortunately Android users will have a wait a little bit longer for the update to come their way, as the feature will only be made available to iOS units for now.

“We hope to bring Hyperlapse to Android in the future. Unfortunately, the requisite APIs are not currently available on Android,” it said.

When the initial feature was announced, Instagram explained how to use the feature.

“We designed Hyperlapse to be as simple as possible. You don’t need an account to create a hyperlapse. Instead, you open up straight to the camera. Tap once to begin recording and tap again to stop. Choose a playback speed that you like between 1x-12x and tap the green check mark to save it to your camera roll. You can share your video on Instagram easily from there.”

[Image – Selfie congratulations – CC by 2.0/Kevin Dooley]
Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.