What could be a better way of demonstrating the interlinked nature of society and all its many colours than this awesome project coming up at BinarySpace, a hackerspace in Vanderbijlpark. They want to put together a Rainbow Nation chair and to do it they want people from all over the country to contribute lots of small parts in lots of different colours.

The project is based on the work of Dutch designer Joris Laarman, who has put together a chair made of jigsaw parts using a simple domestic printer and shared the object files for the chair so anyone can make one. His idea was to create something that looks awesome and anyone can copy for about $30.

It takes 77 parts to build a Makerchair, and BinarySpace want 77 3D printer owners from around the country to help them build one. If you own a printer, you can sign up using the instructions here and ‘claim’ a part from the Makerchair repository. Print it out in ABS plastic in a colour of your choice, and mail it to BinarySpace who will assemble the mighty throne and demonstrate the sheer awesomeness of the South African 3D printing community.

Bits & Parts – Laarman’s organisation – has already undertaken a similar project, and coined a great phrase for it. “Crowdfabrication”.

BinarySpace founder Tom Van den Bon says that once built, the chair will hopefully be shown off at MakerFaire Africa.

“We are currently still deciding whats happening to the piece after it has been built,” he says, “Ideally we would like use it for a display piece for the school roadshows and geek expos or festivals we attend for a while. We’ll maybe even show it at MakerFaire Africa and in the process find a place where it can find a permanent home. Preferably a place where anybody can check it out.”

Want to see the Makerchair in action?

[Main image – CC bitsandparts.org]
Adam is the Editorial Director at htxt media. He has been writing about technology for almost two full decades now. In a previous life, he was the editor of PC Format and Digital Camera Shopper in the UK, before going on to work as a freelance journalist for seven years. His work has appeared in or on Stuff, The Guardian, Linux Format, TechRadar, Wired.co.uk, PC Gamer, Green Futures, The Journalist, The Ecologist and The Review. Adam moved to South Africa in 2012 and loves 3D printers, MakerFairs and tech hubs. He hates seafood. None of his friends remember this when cooking.