Dropbox, Google Docs and OneDrive are all fighting for your attention in the hopes that you will make use of their services. And now mobile operator MTN is climbing into that ring as well.

For a monthly fee of R99, MTN promises that you can store an unlimited amount of documents, photos or music on its newly-launched cloud storage service.

Payment for the service can be deducted using airtime, which according to MTN is a first in SA. The service, called MTN Cloud, is available for iOS and Android.

While it sounds all fancy, we had one question: what type of security do they use to make sure that your precious cat photos are guarded from snooping eyes?

Well, Larry Annetts, Chief Marketing Officer of MTN explained that everything sent to its servers is encrypted, and that MTN itself doesn’t have access to the stored files.

“Information stored on MTN Cloud is encrypted to ensure that its security integrity is not compromised, and data stored is not screened to enhance privacy,” he said.

“In this digital age the amount of information we collect and store is astounding. It is critically important that consumers have the peace of mind knowing that the integrity of that information, be it business or personal, is not compromised. MTN Cloud ensures that this important data is not only stored for posterity, but is easily and safely accessible as well,” Annetts added.

On a PC or Mac? You can make use of MTN’s service via the MTN Cloud website instead, which gives those machines access to your MTN Cloud files from anywhere in the world.

Comparably, services like OneDrive and Dropbox only give you a small amount of free cloud storage space, and their paid-for offers don’t include unlimited storage for the equivalent of R99, so this is a pretty good deal for South Africans.

For MTN, too, as they’re likely going to benefit from the increased data use a service like this will lead to, as you will still need to pay for it over and above the R99 subscription fee.

Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.