Canadian smartphone maker BlackBerry has been clawing back its relevance in a market dominated by Android and Apple and with its latest flagship, the Passport, it has once again grabbed the attention of the youth.

During Mobile World Congress, which it curiously isn’t attending, the company unveiled the Leap smartphone, which it says is aimed at young mobile professionals who value security and privacy.

The company punts the 4G/LTE smartphone as “an affordable all-touch” device, with a 5-inch screen and a battery that will be able to last throughout the entire day.

“In today’s mobile world – influenced by trends like BYOD – where personal and corporate data are frequently under attack from hackers, companies and everyday consumers are finding out the hard way that mobile security is paramount,” said Ron Louks, President, Devices and Emerging Solutions, in a press statement.

“BlackBerry Leap was built specifically for mobile professionals who see their smartphone device as a powerful and durable productivity tool that also safeguards sensitive communications at all times.”

Blackberry explained that the phone also supports encryption, and it has a built-in malware protection system.

In terms of the aforementioned battery, BlackBerry says that it should last about 25 hours – even with heavy use.

“The BlackBerry Leap will power through even your most demanding day. The impressive 2800 mAh battery and optimization of power consumption in BlackBerry 10 gives users more than a full day of productive usage.”

“With today’s launch of BlackBerry Leap we are excited to have the latest touchscreen BlackBerry device available for our reseller partners and their mobile professional customers who want to achieve more. Privacy, security and productivity are important for them and this latest device complements our existing portfolio of BlackBerry products and services, including BES12, BlackBerry Value-Added Services, BlackBerry Passport and BlackBerry Classic,” said Shailendra Gupta, Executive VP & President Ingram Micro Mobility, in a press statement.

Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.