A curved monitor is the stuff of dreams for many gamers, but Phillips believes the immersion curved screens offer can translate just as well with professionals in a work environment. So today, the manufacturer announced its first 34-inch UltraWide curved display that could potentially increase productivity.

In a statement sent to htxt.africa, the manufacturer claims a larger screen could result in people having to switch between windows less, as they can comfortably run different applications side by side thanks to the extra screen space, and the “wraparound effect” of the monitor could also go a long way to minimising distractions.

If you aren’t too busy admiring it, that is.

The 34.1-inch, QuadHD AHS-IPS panel is a thing of beauty, encased in a white cover with a black-grey bezel that runs around the front of the panel itself. Philips’ CrystalClear technology, coupled with a maximum resolution of 3 440×1 440 should ensure even the dreariest of desktops turns heads.

Taking inspiration from gaming monitors, the Philips monitor is equipped with SmartContrast, a feature that tunes the picture depending on what you’re looking at, and SmartResponse which scales the response time to reduce lag in video or games. Not that you should be gaming at work, of course.

At the back of the monitor you’ll find the usual array of inputs, including one HDMI 1.4 port with mobile high-defintion link (MHL). This connection allows people to connect phones and tablets with the appropriate outputs to the monitor, which is just perfect for the day that Microsoft’s Continuum vision becomes a reality, and smartphones become workable desktop replacements.

The Philips curved UltraWide AHS-IPS LCD monitor is expected to grace office workstations sometime before the end of the year, and should be priced in the region of R17 000 (£799.99) depending on the performance of the rand.

Just writing about it makes us want one. Or maybe even three for gaming… but only after we buy three GTX980Tis to run games at 10 320×1 440, of course. Productivity, shmoductivity.

[Image – Philips]