Did you, like our erstwhile Star Wars fan Clinton Mathos, feel a tad let down by the Star Wars Battlefront preview?

Did you spend the entire beta weekend trying to pilot an AT-AT only to have the power up stolen by somebody else every time? Then we have good news for you.

Yesterday maker Dan Olson uploaded a project to Thingiverse that will let you 3D print your own moving AT-AT.

The 28 STL files when printed will give you 69 parts that Olson says you will need to clean up before assembling the nearly 30cm tall model. The largest printed part of the AT-AT, the body, is 205mm long and 110mm wide though for smaller printers the part is split into two smaller parts.

Getting the AT-AT moving will require a 90 RPM micro gearmotor (R246.50), a switch (R2.50) and a 9V battery clip (R3.88) and some glue to keep some of the parts in place.

The working files are available on Thingiverse and Olson has included the SolidWorks files for those that want to mod the AT-AT further.

Once you’ve printed and assembled the parts using the included blender file, you should be ready to traverse the surface of Hoth, although Olson recommends a smooth surface for the best results which you can see in the video below.

This seems like a pretty cool project to dive into over the weekend and if you do attempt to make your homemade AT-AT please share the results with us, we’d love to see the fruit of your labour.

Strangely enough, LEGO was one of the first to create a do-it-yourself version of a walking AT-AT. The set – 10178-1: Motorised Walking AT-AT – was released in 2007 and came with almost 1 200 pieces, which included a motor and a battery pack to provide the locomotion. Check out a video of it to compare its strut to the 3D printed one. The catch here is price, eight years ago this impressive set cost $130 (R1 780), and if you want one now you’ll have to brave the likes of eBay where it goes for several times the original RRP.

[Source – Thingiverse]
Brendyn Lotz writes news, reviews, and opinion pieces for Hypertext. His interests include SMEs, innovation on the African continent, cybersecurity, blockchain, games, geek culture and YouTube.