Outer space is an incredibly vast, er, space, so we know it’s a mathematical certainty that there are a few things out there we haven’t seen before. But when NASA released footage of our own sun recently, it became very clear that we haven’t even laid our eyes on the majority of the stuff that happens in our neck of the universe, nevermind the farther reaches of space.

The space agency released around 30 minutes of footage of our sun in glorious 4K, giving us a unique glimpse of what, exactly, is keeping us alive down here.

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is focused on the sun every day, and captures images of it every 12 seconds in 10 different wavelengths, each of which helps highlight a different temperature of solar material.

In NASA’s video, seen below, we get to see the massive solar flares that shoot out towards earth, and how the surface of the sun is shifting and changing over time.

NASA explained that it took a team of “media specialists” about 10 hours to create one minute of footage… and this video is 30 minutes long. Doing the maths, if the team worked flat out without taking breaks or sleeping, this video would have taken just under two weeks to produce. Sjoe.

“Presented in ultra-high definition video (4K), the video presents the nuclear fire of our life-giving star in intimate detail, offering [a] new perspective into our own relationships with [the] grand forces of the solar system,” NASA said on its YouTube channel.

[Source – NASA]
Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.