It seems as though the City of Johannesburg (CoJ) is confused about the issue of ownership when it comes to images, video or audio posted some social media websites.

The CoJ was called out in a public tweet by the Managing Director of communication agency Cerebra for using an image without giving proper credit to the photographer.

The City replied to Rodney in a tweet, saying that every images that is posted onto the microblogging site was fair game, as it belongs to Twitter.

The reality is that Rodney is somewhat correct. According to Twitter’s Terms of Service, the rights to the media is retained by the creator, but by posting it onto the site, you also grant Twitter the permission to use it.

According to Section 5 of Twitter’s T&C’s:

You retain your rights to any Content you submit, post or display on or through the Services. By submitting, posting or displaying Content on or through the Services, you grant us a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free license (with the right to sublicense) to use, copy, reproduce, process, adapt, modify, publish, transmit, display and distribute such Content in any and all media or distribution methods (now known or later developed).

After some heated exchanges on the site, CoJ eventually credit photographer Andrew Cleland.

[Image – CC by 2.0/Earth Hour]
Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.