AMD’s appeal to enthusiast PC builders and content creators hasn’t been all that strong in recent years with Intel having that market pretty much covered.

So when Team Red announced Ryzen Threadripper earlier this year with 16-core and 12-core iterations we were excited to see what AMD could offer the high-end market, as it turns out, a lot.

In an announcement yesterday AMD showed off the Ryzen Threadripper 1950X and the Ryzen Threadripper 1920X. The big boy is the 1950X with 16 cores and 32 threads running at a base clock of 3.4GHz but can be boosted to 4.0GHz.

The 1920X runs 12-cores with 24 threads and offers a slightly higher base clock of 3.5GHz but also peaks at 4.0GHz when boosted.

Both chips will run on the new X399 platform and will hit markets in August but pre-orders for an Alienware Area 51 PC containing Threadripper will kick off on 27th July worldwide.

What does this mean for content creators?

During the announcement AMD show off Ryzen running the Cinebench R15 benchmark (multi-threaded) to give folks an idea of the Threadripper’s rendering chops.

The Threadripper 1920X was put up against Intel’s Core i9-7900X (10-core, 20 thread) and let’s cut the bull, AMD beat Intel hands down. “We turned in a score of over 2400 for Threadripper and just over 2100 for the Core i9,” AMD’s Robert Hallock said.

But that’s not even the best bit.

The 1950X scored 3042 in the benchmark which is staggering.

Equally staggering however is the pricing that AMD announced.

The 12-core 1920X will start retailing at $799 while the 1950X will get a price of $999.

While that pricing is steep it’s still cheaper than Intel’s Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition was at launch ($1 723) and will likely be cheaper than Intel’s Core i9-7980XE when it lands later this year. Of course Intel could surprise us completely and offer its beast at the same price.

Any way you slice it though Threadripper is compelling and we’re excited to find out more about this chip as its August release gets closer.

Brendyn Lotz writes news, reviews, and opinion pieces for Hypertext. His interests include SMEs, innovation on the African continent, cybersecurity, blockchain, games, geek culture and YouTube.