Cape Town residents need no longer fear the threat of the taps being turned off in 2018; this is according to Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Mmusi Maimane.

At a briefing at the DA’s Federal Head Office in Cape Town earlier today, Maimane explained how citizens and the DA banded together to reverse the rampant water usage that left dams with only 17.2 percent of usable water.

“I am therefore happy to announce today that provided we continue consuming water at current levels, and we receive decent winter rainfall this year, Day Zero will not occur in 2018. This means the taps will stay open in 2018,” the DA leader said in a statement.

“We can and we must continue to use less than 50 litres of water per day so that Day Zero can be defeated in its entirety,” Maimane added.

Capetonians have reduced water consumption from 1.2 billion litres per day in 2015 to 520 million litres per day.

But Maimane warns that Cape Town is not out of the woods just yet.

“While it is now unlikely to occur in 2018, Day Zero is still a very real possibility during the 2019 summer months if we do not have significant rainfall this winter. I want to reiterate, and cannot stress enough, that we need to keep at current consumption levels until at least after the winter rainfall,” Maimane said.

The DA leader also said that through augmentation projects, the City of Cape Town will add an extra 190 megalitres to the water system, with plans to ramp up production to 300 megalitres by 2020. In case the switch to megalitres seems a bit strange, that’s 190 million litres and 300 million litres, respectively.

[Image – CC 0 Pixabay]

 

Brendyn Lotz writes news, reviews, and opinion pieces for Hypertext. His interests include SMEs, innovation on the African continent, cybersecurity, blockchain, games, geek culture and YouTube.