At this stage it’s a well known fact that Intel has its eye on the discrete GPU market but it appears as if the firm has its eyes set on more than just enterprise applications.

Last year’s hiring of former Radeon Technologies Group head Raja Koduri made it clear that Intel had a graphics card play but until now it was largely believed that these GPUs would be aimed at data centers.

A new report by Forbes however appears to confirm that Koduri, who now heads up Intel’s GPU project code-named Arctic Sound, has a split off the project to focus on streaming applications for data centers and gamers.

Now, we need to augment this news with a disclaimer. None of this has been confirmed explicitly by Intel but Forbes does point the firm is looking to hire a number of graphics engineers.

It’s also a move that makes sense given Koduri’s move from AMD where he was in charge of graphics cards.

Another clue to Intel wanting to break into the GPU market is in the firm’s collaboration with AMD on Kaby Lake G. That chip sports an Intel CPU alongside an AMD Radeon Vega GPU.

At this stage of the game however Intel has to buy those GPU chips from AMD, being able to make its own chips might be costly to start off with but could pay dividends in the long run.

We’re happy to see more competition in the GPU space which has been dominated by AMD and Nvidia since we started building PCs. We just hope against hope that Intel GPUs don’t become the best cards for mining cryptocurrency.