If you want a part of World of Warcraft for your desk or shelf to hide a few things in, consider printing out your own Horde chest.

The version you see on this page comes to us from David Cook II, but it was based on an existing model from years ago.

Using Tinkercad, Cook wanted to make his more accurate to the game. He did this by adding in rivet heads, the keyhole and the three studs that surround it.

Together with these changes, the model was also sliced in two for easier printing, bringing the time to make these changes to just a single hour.

Printing took quite a bit longer at 12 hours, not including a failed version that ate up 7 hours on its own.

After cleaning up the raw print a bit – including making sure the handles still moved as intended – the handles and spikes were sanded down.

Super glue was used to join the parts together and Mod Podge helped smooth things over. Mod Podge was used again as a protective layer after the chest was painted with acrylics.

Aside from the plastic here a small piece of chopstick was used as the hinge and some foam was added to reduce the grinding noise of opening and closing. In total this finishing added 10 more hours to the project time.

If you’d like to make your own Horde chest the files can be found for free over on Thingiverse.

Make sure you scale it to fit your needs. The one you see here is 10 centimetres wide, 6.7 centimetres deep and 8.5 centimetres tall. If you’re crazy enough and have something like a Cheetah printer, we’re sure you could make a 1:1 scale version.

While a 3D printed chest from a game may sound like an oddity, we’ve actually featured many in the past. There’s one from Magic to store your card, a breakable version from God of War, and even a light-up Clash Royale offering.

Previous 3D Prints of the Day: