NSFAS revealed earlier this week after their extended closing date on 2nd December that only 24 percent of applications were from students who applied to TVET colleges while 72 percent was from students who applied to universities.

The former is a rather small percentage and as the department of higher education and training is preparing for 2019, it is anticipating a large number of prospective students to attempt walk-in registrations at TVET colleges.

Due to a high number of walk-in applications, in 2012 a mother of a prospective student died during a stampede at the University of Johannesburg’s Bunting Road campus after waiting in long queues to make late applications.

The department and National Financial Student Aid Scheme (NSFAS) will maintain a strong presence in campuses to avoid chaos, according to minister of higher education and training Naledi Pandor

“We will be far more proactive than we might have been in the past, we will maintain a strong presence of both the department and NSFAS on college campuses where we think help may be required,” said Pandor.

NSFAS is expecting around 200 000 prospective students to attempt walk-in registrations in the beginning of the academic year, despite the 24 percent of students who have already applied during the extended application period being quite low.

“At the beginning of the year we will meet with TVET college principles as well as the new student leadership to brief them on how they may assist, to ensure that we don’t have long queues and clashes in those queues,” concludes Pandor.

[Source – Business Day]

[Image – CC 0 Pixabay]