Later this year Tesla will task hackers with breaking into a Model 3 and if they manage to it they will win a Model 3.

Before we continue, this is not an invitation to start taking a crack at random Model 3’s in the wild, not that we think black hat hackers would need an invitation.

So why then will Tesla ask hackers to crack into its car?

The firm will be taking part in the annual Pwn2Own hacking contest being held in Vancouver, Canada in March of this year. The contest is run by Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative.

The contest will feature five categories, namely:

  • Web browsers
  • Virtualisation software
  • Enterprise applications
  • Server-side software
  • Automotive

Apple, Google, Microsoft and VMware are among the targets selected by the Zero Day Initiative for the event.

It should be pointed out that Tesla does run its own bug bounty program. This program has seen the firm able to deliver over the air security updates to Tesla vehicles.

That’s a good thing because according to a report by Tech Crunch, there is no guarantee that a vulnerability will be found at Pwn2Own. That having been said, vulnerabilities are usually found in 50 percent of the targets.

Whether hackers will rise to the challenge of hacking a car remains to be seen. The automotive category is new at Pwn2Own but perhaps the lure of winning a Tesla Model will be temptation enough.

Brendyn Lotz writes news, reviews, and opinion pieces for Hypertext. His interests include SMEs, innovation on the African continent, cybersecurity, blockchain, games, geek culture and YouTube.