One of the big applications when it comes to Augmented Reality (AR) lies in smartphones, with their mix of cameras, screens and processors allowing developers to come up with some handy solutions or services.

Case in point, a new offering called Nike Fit from… Nike.

The feature is a built into the Nike app, which is a platform that allows users to browse the latest apparel and footwear from the clothing giant, and make a few purchases. In the case of shoes, getting the correct size is particular important, and this is where Nike Fit comes into play.

“Length and width don’t provide nearly enough data to get a shoe to fit comfortably. Sizing as we know it is a gross simplification of a complex problem,” explained the company in press release.

According to its developers, there is a new option when purchasing a particular pair to measure your feet. It’s available on most of the pairs of shoes on the Nike app, as each pair is different in terms of the way that fit around your foot. Therefore if you’re a 9.5 for one pair, you may be 10 in another.

It’s also a far bigger problem than many realise.

“60% of people at any given time are walking around in the wrong size shoe. Half a million people complain about purchasing the wrong shoe size a year – just in North America,” Nike adds.

So how does it work? Well the Nike app will access your smartphone (app compatible devices only) and scan your feet once placed at the right angle. From there 13 different data points are used to create a map of the foot’s morphology, with a profile capable of being stored as well.

This feature is also going to made available at stores, although this is limited to select ones Stateside for now. Adding them to local ones, however, would be a nice touch.

Nike Fit is not just an AR gimmick either, with the company stating that it wants to use said data and what it learns from the tool to improve its shoe design moving forward, as well as enhance its customisation platforms, like Nike ID.

“In the short term, Nike Fit will improve the way Nike designs, manufactures and sells shoes — product better tailored to match consumer needs,” the company says.

“The ultimate goal is to, eventually, totally personalize product. No number, no gender, just your name and a custom-made pair of shoes,” they end.

When he's not reviewing the latest smartphones, Robin-Leigh is writing about everything tech-related from IoT and smart cities, to 5G and cloud computing. He's also a keen photographer and dabbles in console games.