Amazon CEO Jeff Bezo’s plans to dominate space with Blue Origin is well-known by now, but it looks like the firm itself also has designs to take to the skies. More specifically it wants to launch a series of internet-beaming satellites, much like Google, Facebook and SpaceX are doing, with its own Project Kuiper.

The firm is also trying to get said satellites into orbit as soon as possible, with a recent FCC filing noting that it plans to launch 3 236 satellites once it gets the okay from the US regulatory body.

Added to that the filing explains that Amazon plans to have the Project Kuiper satellites grouped into 98 orbital planes and orbiting at an altitude of between 590 and 630 kilometres.

The project is aimed at delivering internet connectivity to “tens of millions” of people, the firms notes, with its initial plan to service those residing in the United States for now. To that end Amazon has also asked for clearance to operate in North America, but has stated that it will not beam down connectivity in Alaska.

Along with all of these provisions, Amazon is also asking to employ anti-interference technology to ensure an unimpeded experience for users, although they have not outlined what kinds of connectivity speeds can be expected.

Finally the company confirms that the satellites will be de-orbited 10 years after launching, to ensure that it will not be accused of further contributing to the debris floating around Earth.

As for when Project Kuiper will be up and running, remains to be seen, but the likes of SpaceX will soon have a competitor.

[Image – Photo by NASA on Unsplash]
When he's not reviewing the latest smartphones, Robin-Leigh is writing about everything tech-related from IoT and smart cities, to 5G and cloud computing. He's also a keen photographer and dabbles in console games.