Recently Twitch lost its golden boy in Tyler “Ninja” Blevins who departed for greener pastures at Mixer.

Since joining Mixer, Blevins has seen his subscriber count grow to a million with that figure climbing constantly.

As for his old Twitch account which amassed 14 million followers, Twitch repurposed it to showcase other streamers on the platform. While the streamers being showcased are mostly playing Fortnite, at the weekend that changed.

On Sunday it was discovered that Blevin’s old channel was promoting an account streaming pornography. It’s worth keeping in mind that Blevins has no control over what happens on that channel anymore, a fact he addressed in a Twitter video.

The streamer says that Twitch doesn’t promote other channels on offline channels and while he apologised for the lewd content that appeared on his former channel, he also slammed Twitch.

However, chief executive officer at Twitch, Emmett Shear says that the firm has been experimenting with this feature.

“Our community comes to Twitch looking for live content. To help ensure they find great, live channels we’ve been experimenting with showing recommended content across Twitch, including on streamer’s pages that are offline,” said Shear.

While we appreciate Twitch trying to give other streamers a leg-up by featuring them on Blevins’ old page, we do also understand why he’s not a fan of his page being used for this.

Firstly, his branding is still scattered across the page making it harder to separate him from the channel. Secondly, he did put a lot of work into growing that follower base and for Twitch to just assume control of that profile without so much as checking with the creator seems like a foul ball.

Yeah we know there are probably terms and conditions which grant Twitch that sort of power and control but perhaps Twitch should let it be.

Perhaps Twitch should spend the time it’s using on this to better its systems. This isn’t the first time pornography and other questionable content has made it on to Twitch.

Earlier this year the Artifact category was flooded with content ranging from pornography to the Christchurch massacre. Perhaps Twitch should get its house in order before trying to promote users through another user’s profile.

Brendyn Lotz writes news, reviews, and opinion pieces for Hypertext. His interests include SMEs, innovation on the African continent, cybersecurity, blockchain, games, geek culture and YouTube.