Dating app Bumble – a service very similar to Tinder with the unique proviso being that women need to message first – now has a new feature to combat catfishing and to ensure that users are speaking to the right people.

On matching with a new contact, users may spot a new option in the form of a blue line of text reading “Confirm they’re the real deal” which will send a request to the other person asking them to get verified.

On Bumble verification isn’t meant to ensure you’re some person of popular interest like on Twitter or Instagram, instead it’s meant to ensure that a user is the same person as the one in their uploaded images.

This process starts with pulling a random photo from a bank of around a hundred different poses. The app will then ask the user to replicate this unique pose in a picture. This new picture will then be compared to the existing uploads to ensure that the user is a real person.

As detailed by Bumble this process is apparently done by a human and not some machine learning software, which either fills you with confidence or makes you worry a bit.

Regardless, the aim here is that, by asking users to take this unique photos, it should be impossible for malicious users and bots to pretend to be someone else. We’re sure the system isn’t infallible, but it is a nice safeguard.

If the verification is successful the app can be used as normal, while a failure will result in a profile being turned off and becoming invisible.

Before you think of asking anyone to verify themselves on the app, you yourself must be verified following the same process.

While the option to verify yourself has existed on the app for some time now, requesting that your matches do the same is a new addition.

The Bumble verification request process.
Clinton has been a programmer, engineering student, project manager, asset controller and even a farrier. Now he handles the maker side of htxt.africa.