Back when 4K and UHD displays were first making their way onto the market there was a lot of confusion about what those monikers meant.

Thankfully the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) was on hand to set out clear definitions of what constitutes a 4K TV and now that body has done the same for 8K displays.

The idea behind the specification is to relay to buyers that the technology contained within a product meets a particular standard, in this case, an 8K display.

The CTA consulted with major companies in the video sector to develop the specification.

So then, what makes an 8K TV a true 8K TV?

  • Display resolution – There should be at least 33 million active pixels with at least 7680 horizontally and 4320 vertically within a 16:9 window.
  • Digital Inputs – One or more HDMI inputs supporting resolution of 7680×4320 pixels, bit depth of 10-bits, frame rates of 24, 30 and 60 frames per second, HDR transfer functions and colourimetry as specified by ITU-R BT.2100, and HDCP v2.2 or equivalent content protection.
  • Up-conversion – the ability to upscale SD, HD and 4K video to display it at an 8K UHD display resolution.
  • Bit Depth – Capability to receive 10-bit 8K images and render an image that shows responsiveness to changes to any of the 10 bits.

Of course, an 8K TV can be better but the specifications above should serve as a decent baseline for manufacturers to work off of.

More importantly, it gives buyers a way to know that when they buy an 8K TV, they are assured that the product meets certain specifications.

For that purpose the CTA has created a new logo that manufacturers can use to relay to customers that its product meets the specifications.

“This 8K Ultra HD definition is the product of our Video Division Board’s dedication and hard work. As a result, retailers and consumers will know products that carry the accompanying logo deliver 8K UHD quality and performance,” Said president and chief executive officer at CTA, Gary Shapiro.

[Image – CC BY 2.0 LG]