After publishing and then pulling a teardown of the Samsung Galaxy Fold earlier this year, iFixit has republished the teardown on its website.

Of course this is not the teardown we saw back in April due to the fact that the Fold has been changed somewhat by Samsung. How much has changed? Well iFixit took a look.

The teardown starts off praising Samsung for adding a cover on the bezel where the two halves of the display meet. At first this cover wasn’t present meaning dust could get under that folding display.

That having been said, there are still ingress points on the handset.

“It seems Samsung is trying to cover the most immediately threatening ingress points, but it’s extremely challenging to completely seal off a phone with this many moving parts,” writes iFixit.

Something that hasn’t changed much are the bezels around the display. Samsung is still seemingly being spend-thrift with adhesive and iFixit worries that over time those bezels will peel away, exposing the screen to damage.

The incredibly engineered hinge is now covered with tape in order to protect the phone from ingress at the hinge. This is rather important as ahead of its initial release folks were worried that a piece of dirt in the hinge could be fatal.

iFixit also took a look at the display. Something to note is that the display is now stronger thanks to a metal backplate. The “screen protector” that caused so much trouble back in April has been extended to the edge of the display and overall ingress protection has been improved.

That having been said, the Fold is still as fragile as a butterfly.

“This thing is still pretty fragile. We’ll have to see how it holds up in the real world, but for now we can’t help but wonder: why weren’t these revisions a part of the first Fold? It took reviewers (and us) less than a week to figure out the phone’s weak points. Why ship something they must have known to be so easily breakable,” iFixit wrote.

Overall the Fold still scores a 2/10 for repairability (with 10 being the easiest to repair) with iFixit noting that the fragility of the device would make repairs tricky.