The 2019 matric students of South Africa finally have their results and can now move onto the next stage in their education. The University of South Africa (Unisa) is encouraging those who want to do so, to register online.

A message from principal and vice chancellor at Unisa, professor Mandla S Makhanya, urges prospective students to make use of online registration in lieu of doing so in person at a Unisa campus.

The university opened up registration for the first semester of 2020 on 3rd January, which will then close on 24th January. As with most semesters new and returning students flocked to get their names down which has continued until today.

As for why Makhanya and Unisa are pushing for online registration, the reason seems to be long queues. The official Unisa Twitter account recently shared this video showing the extremely busy nature of one campus as students wait in long lines.

While avoiding the wait is preferable, the reason many are seeking face to face interactions with Unisa staff is because of the online registrations themselves. Aside from the site and registration process crashing under heavy load, some parts of the process are vague and students find themselves unsure how to proceed. When faced with this problem, and no help can be found online, visiting a campus for assistance is often one of the few ways to proceed.

For anyone wondering why those struggling simply don’t pick up a phone and call in instead, it’s because the university is notorious for not answering. We’ve been informed of calls which bounce around Unisa employees for hours together with constant unanswered ringing.

All of this means that matrics looking to register may find themselves stuck between the unreliable and vague nature of online, and the long waits of in person registration. This announcement from Makhanya simply pushes them towards the former.

“On behalf of the entire Unisa community, I extend hearty congratulations to the Matric Class of 2019, who have achieved an unprecedented and record-breaking pass rate of 81,3 %. This is a significant step upwards from the 78,2 % achieved by the Class of 2018. We share the sentiments of our government that this achievement, the highest percentage ever recorded since the advent of democracy in 1994, is an indication that our education is on an upward trajectory,” Makhanya concludes about the relatively promising 2019 results.