Much like Brexit it feels like we’ve been writing, talking, debating and waiting for POPI to come into effect in South Africa. The regulation holds several significant implications and could prove to be a watershed act much like GDPR has been for several tech companies.

Sadly we still do not have a date for when POPI will take effect, but the Information Regulator has provided an update of sorts as it has called for public comment as to the guidelines for POPI with a view to create a code of conduct for the Protection of Personal Information.

You can find out how to direct your comments and thoughts here, with the process having already begun on 5th December last year, with it closing later this week on 17th January at 16:00.

Comments can be delivered in writing to the physical address of the Information Regulator, but given the time constraints the alternative email address is a far more efficient avenue.

“The Guidelines set out the form and contents to which the Codes of Conduct must adhere,” explains a press statement shared with Hypertext.

“For example, according to the Guidelines, a Code of Conduct could provide clarity to an industry or body (specifically, a body that exercises a regulatory or supervisory role in an industry or profession) as to how the conditions for the lawful processing of personal information (which includes the personal information of natural persons and juristic persons, such as companies and trusts) are to be applied and complied with, given the particular features of an industry or body in which the responsible parties are operating,” it continues.

The guidelines will also cover a variety of aspects as it pertains to POPI, but the following are identified as the three most significant:

  • Resources required in order to develop and implement a Code of Conduct.
  • Practical guidelines on how to draft a Code of Conduct.
  • Complaints handling procedures; and reviewing, varying and revocation of approved Codes of Conduct.

While the wait for POPI to be put into action continues, perhaps 2020 is the year it comes to fruition.

[Image – Photo by Jonas Jacobsson on Unsplash]