Earlier today Amazon Web Services’ (AWS) Africa Region in Cape Town finally launched. This means a lot of new and exciting things for everyone on the African continent – some of which we covered here – but the possibility of better online gaming experiences seems to be what everyone is talking about.

In the hours since the announcement the #FortniteAfricanServers hashtag has taken off on Twitter. At the time of writing it is hovering around 31K tweets, but we wouldn’t be surprised if that’s closer to 50K by the time you read these words. Every time we refresh the hashtag a few hundred more are added into the conversation.

The current number of tweets for the hashtag. This will likely be much higher when you visit Twitter again.

The hope of those engaging with the hashtag is to prompt Epic Games to institute local servers. Fortnite does utilise AWS so it seems like a perfect fit to improve the gameplay for local Fortnite players.

Reading over a lot of the tweets the issue of high ping of course comes up, a natural consequence of playing online when servers are so far away.

Even for those not hoping to participate in high levels of play or esports, local servers are a massive boon to online play. There’s really no downside for consumers, but for developers and publishers it does mean an investment and time and money to implement, even with local AWS support.

Because of the relatively low amount of players in South Africa and on the rest of the African continent, this usually means that we’re looked over as resources are spent on more profitable regions.

Today seems to be a bit of a perfect world in the world of Fortnite news. On top of this trending topic of local servers, the game was finally made available on the Google Play Store. Epic Games has kept the Android version of their golden goose off of that store to avoid paying Google its 30 percent cut.

At the same time current events featuring Travis Scott and members of the X-Force are happening inside of the game.