With a number of high-profile games having their initial release dates pushed back as a result of COVID-19, one of the titles we’re still eagerly awaiting to play is Ghost of Tsushima.

The Sucker Punch-developed samurai game is still on course for its new 17th July release date on the PS4, and to whet the appetite even further, the developer served up 18 minutes of atmospheric gameplay footage as part of PlayStation State of Play presentation.

While we understand that gameplay footage and the real on-console experience can often differ quite greatly, when it comes to Ghost of Tsushima, the game looks even better than we first saw footage of it a couple of years ago.

To that end, Sucker Punch walks us through a few different elements in the video below, starting with some of the design aesthetic, and how the environment plays an important role. Objects or areas of interest will glint in the sunlight for example, along with smoke and animals often directing the protagonist, Jin, to different areas of the map.

We also got to see two different fighting methods, where Jin takes on a Mongol enemy camp in both his traditional samurai fighting style, and what Sucker Punch is calling the Ghost. The former relies on quick reactions to parry and counter strike enemies, while the former employs stealth, diversionary tactics and pretty much any means to kill your opponents.

Other elements previewed in the video is Jin’s armour and appearance, all of which can be customised depending on resources collected in-game. Along with changing up colourways for clothing and armour, Sucker Punch explains that certain armour also have functional benefits and drawbacks when fighting, so there will be a few things to consider before donning anything.

Lastly, we got to see the Samurai Cinema and Photo Mode. The latter allows you to take screenshots in-game, along with the ability to custom colour grades and change some environmental elements. The Cinema mode offers up a noire black and white colour style while playing to pay homage to old Japanese films like Seven Samurai.

If you’ve got 18 minutes to spare, or want to see whether this forthcoming title is worth your time, hit play on the video after the break.