Mid-roll adverts –  those that appear in the middle of a YouTube video instead of at the beginning – are going to become more common on the platform from 27th July onward.

This is because of a recent announcement YouTube has made in regards to which videos qualify for these kinds of ads. In the past only videos which are 10 minutes or longer could use mid-rolls, which is why you may have noticed so many videos being made in the last few years packed with filler to stretch to that length.

From 27th July this requirement has been reduced to eight minutes.

Channel owners who already run adverts on their videos have recently been sent an email detailing this change, but it’s possible for the rest of us to see the specifics too.

The YouTube Help section of Google Support has added an update to its page on managing ad breaks in long videos.

“Today, only videos longer than 10 minutes are eligible for mid-roll ads. Starting in late July, videos longer than 8 minutes will be eligible for mid-roll ads. As part of this change, mid-roll ads will be turned on for all eligible existing videos and future video uploads, including those videos where you may have previously opted out of mid-roll ads. Videos that already have mid-roll ads turned on will not be impacted. If mid-roll ads are not a good fit for your videos, you can indicate this preference in YouTube Studio by July 27, 2020,” The update reads.

The reason for this changes seems to be obvious: more money for content creators and YouTube itself. It goes a bit deeper than that, however. As enabling mid-rolls is opt-out, instead of opt-in, many channels which have been abandoned or neglected will now have new ads.

While those taking greater care of their channel can opt-out using the links provided by YouTube above, the rest will be changed over.

If you’d like to completely dodge ads on YouTube, while supporting creators, we still recommend springing for YouTube Premium. No ads, video downloads, screen-off video play and YouTube Music all make it worth the monthly fee.

Clinton has been a programmer, engineering student, project manager, asset controller and even a farrier. Now he handles the maker side of htxt.africa.