The Canon EOS R lineup has been the Japanese company’s answer to the high-end mirrorless offerings of Fujifilm and Sony and, earlier today, it revealed two additions to this lineup in the form of the R5 and R6 at its REIMAGINE live streamed event.

When it comes to differentiating the two, the EOS R5 is viewed as the flagship model and the R6 sits just below that. To give you an idea of just how flagship the Canon EOS R5 is, the body alone is listed at $3 899 Stateside, making it the company’s second most expensive pro camera to date.

Unfortunately official local availability and pricing for both these models is still in the offing, and we’ll certainly share those details once known, but there is still plenty to dissect in terms of what Canon has developed for the new EOS R additions.

Starting with the more expensive EOS R5, it is packing a 45MP sensor that boasts a native ISO range of 100 – 51 200. Added to this is the ability to record uncropped 8K RAW video at 29.97 fps or uncropped 4K DCI at 59.94fps.

Before you go thinking that you’ll be shooting a lot of 8K content on it, you should know that it can muster up to 20 minutes of 8K recording at room temperature before the battery empties.

Other notable elements on the EOS R5 include a dual-pixel autofocus system, with eye tracking for smaller animals and humans thrown in for good measure. Its electronic viewfinder also yields a refresh rate of 120fps, with a 5.76 million dot resolution and a 3.2″ 2.1 million dot variable angle touchscreen on the back.

We are only looking at the R5 on paper for now, but for those wanting a seamless replacement for their DSLR, but in the the mirrorless form factor, this may be it.

Let’s move onto the EOS R6 now, which comes in at around $2 499 for the body. It’s quite a bit less expensive than the new flagship, but certainly does not come cheap.

In terms of features, the Canon EOS R6 is utilising the same 20.1MP sensor as found in the 1D X Mark III. This yields a video recording capability of 4K at 60fps or 1080p at 120fps. These are not numbers to snark at, but it’s clear that the EPS R6 is packing the bigger punch in terms of specifications.

We have not shot, or indeed gotten hands on, with either of these two mirrorless cameras yet, so it remains to be seen whether the similar form factor, but lessened specs of the R6 will make it truly good value for money compared to an older, but more powerful DSLR.

For a more in-depth look at both of these new mirrorless cameras, we suggest giving the comparison video from Canon Australia a watch below.

Be advised though, that any pricing and availability is strictly for Down Under, as we’re yet to get official information from Canon South Africa on that front.