Jaguar Land Rover, along with the University of Cambridge, has developed a new kind of touchscreen that, well, doesn’t require you to touch it.

The “predictive touch” tech, as it’s being called, uses some familiar tech you may be sick of hearing of in the news: artificial intelligence and sensors.

“The technology uses artificial intelligence to determine the item the user intends to select on the screen early in the pointing task, speeding up the interaction. A gesture tracker uses vision-based or radio frequency-based sensors, which are increasingly common in consumer electronics, to combine contextual information such as user profile, interface design and environmental conditions with data available from other sensors, such as an eye-gaze tracker, to infer the user’s intent in real time,” reads a release we received about the new touchscreen tech.

You can see a demo of predictive touch in the header image above, or in the short video below.

If you’re guessing that this system was created to reduce physical contact because of the coronavirus, you’d only be half right. The other benefit predictive touch is touting is that of improved driver focus.

According to lab and road tests touted by Jaguar Land Rover, predictive touch can reduce the amount of time and “interaction effort” that a driver would use on a regular touchscreen by 50 percent. This should mean less time fiddling with the radio, GPS or aircon, and more time watching the road.

As for when we’ll be seeing this new system in the latest cars or in other applications, both Jaguar Land Rover and the University of Cambridge have not said. Promisingly, the pair have touted the fact that the solution can be implemented into existing touchscreens as long as the input data for the machine learning can be supplied.

This may result in predictive touch becoming a common sight in the future as we continue to contain COVID-19 and any future pandemics like it.