It looks like Apple could be taking a play out of Xbox’s book when the new iPhones are expected to be unveiled globally in October later this year, with a Bloomberg report noting that the company could be bundling some of its digital services as subscription packages alongside the new devices.

Internally those close to the project at the Cupertino-based firm are referring to it as Apple One, but it remains to be seen if this will be its name if it officially hits the market.

It is said that Apple One will play host to different tiers, with a basic package consisting of Apple Music and Apple TV+ for example. It is unclear how much Apple would charge for such a bundle, but the more expensive tiers are said to add services like Apple Arcade, Apple News+ and additional storage on iCloud.

Another offering being added to the mix, but yet to see the light of day, is still-to-be-named fitness subscription service akin to what Nike or cycling firm Peleton has.

This service would be paired with a standalone app and offer users access to workouts and virtual classes. Given the strong presence Apple has with its Watch, such a fitness-focused offering would make a lot of sense.

While Apple is yet to comment on the report, Bloomberg says the bundling subscription model will be marketed to families in particular. Again this approach makes sense given the popularity of Netflix and Spotify’s Family Plan as a means of accessing digital services.

“For example, if a family subscribes today to all of Appleā€™s major services plus the highest iCloud storage tier, that would cost about $45 a month. A new bundle could knock more than $5 off that,” writes the publication.

Whether these bundled offers would provide better value for money is unclear, but it would be foolhardy for Apple not to sweeten the deal with discounted rates.

With Apple’s Tim Cook firmly stating that services, and not devices, are the future of the company’s continued success, the announcing of these bundles is not surprising in the least, provided the price is right.

[Source – Bloomberg]